Wednesday, November 14, 2007

The Murder of Meredith Kercher, pt 2

Left: Amanda Knox on her MySpace page, as reprinted in the UK Telegraph.



A couple of days ago, my blog stats when BOOM again* all because people are DYING to know about the Meredith Kercher/Amanda Knox murder case. Nobody seems to be Googling the guys' names... people want the lesbian-tinged, sadomasochistic, play-by-play action. As naive as this sounds, I really didn't think I'd get 300 hits in 48 hours, all due to searches like "Kercher Knox rough sex murder" (there! I made it easy for yall!)... so now, it's time for some feminist analysis, if I can manage it.

The fact is: I think this case may be out of my depth. Where to start?

I've asked some people who are genuinely into "rough sex" (obviously one of those eye-of-the-beholder things; rough sex for one person will not necessarily be rough to another) if they might contribute or comment on this case for me, and they seem thoroughly disinclined to do so. I totally understand that, since they should not have to answer for an isolated SM crackpot on the loose, but I am still curious about what they think of the press coverage so far. Fox News and various other news outlets can hardly stop leering long enough to focus on the facts of the case, try as they might. How often do you have free-wheelin American girls from Seattle running amok in Italy, forcing "rough sex" on nice, proper British girls? And bringing in Italian boyfriends and Congolese bar-owners to participate in the fun? Good lord. That's enough for a movie all by itself.

And... did the whole thing just get out of hand, or was Meredith's torture-death the intention from the git-go?

What really sets this case apart is the fact that Amanda had an ongoing narrative, as FOXY KNOXY--a MySpace blogger who openly wrote about BDSM scenarios and had something of a fan-base. One wonders if this case would keep us so enthralled if this pre-conceived character did not already exist, as the Columbine boys also had online personas that dovetailed with their real-life intentions. The Telegraph puts it very plainly, titling their update: AMANDA KNOX WROTE STORIES ABOUT RAPE (all that's required is an exclamation point, or several):

Amanda Knox, a 20-year-old language and creative writing student from Seattle in the United States, wrote enthusiastically on the social networking site MySpace about her new life studying Italian in Perugia, about her friends and her new house.

Like most people of her age, her tastes are diverse and she rambles about the people she loves and the ways she likes to spend her time.

But Knox, writing under the name Foxy Knoxy, also reveals a different side to her character with a series of short stories - one concerns a stalker and another talks about the drugging and rape of a young woman.

In the latter, an older brother Edgar, challenges his younger brother Kyle over a woman called Victoria.

His brother responds, laughing: "Icky Vicky, huh? Jeez, Edgar. You had me going there. A thing you have to know about chicks is that they don't know what they want," before attacking him.

Detectives currently questioning Knox are expected to trawl through the blogs, and every element of her life, in the coming days, looking for any clues as to how an average young woman at the beginning one of the most exciting periods of her life might have been caught up in murderous sexual violence.

It was Knox and her Italian boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, who claim to have first found Meredith Kercher's body at the house the two girls shared.

Knox gave an alibi to police but in the four days after the killing, it allegedly began to crumble.

She last logged onto her MySpace page on Monday - four days after the killing, but will not have seen messages of support posted by friends telling her they love her and to "stay strong".

Before this week's events, she corresponded regularly with friends and family back home, telling them "I still miss those people I love".

Of her new life in Europe, the primary school teacher's daughter wrote in a blog on October 15: "I've actually been living in Italy for about a month now and I've had classes for two weeks so far. Everything is going great.

"I really like the Italian lifestyle. everything shuts down in the middle of the day so everyone can have a three hour lunch break. I love it. I wish we had that in America.

"I think Americans work too much and don't live. Having that time in the middle of the day reminds you that life really isn't all about going to work and making money.

"It's about who you are and what you choose to do and who you choose to spend your time with."

She also refers to the man who is suspected of carrying out the killing with her, Congolese bar owner Patrick Lumumba.

"I've been working every night (except for Monday night) from 10pm to 2.30am at a bar called Le Chic. It's a really small place owned by this man from the Congo. His name is Patrick," she wrote.

She makes no mention of Sollecito in her profile.

She is however chided by her aunt - who is unnamed on MySpace- for having a picture of an apparently naked man called Federico on her page.

Her aunt warned her: "Do not get naked with strange Italian men!!” Knox replied that Federico was just a friend.

Under "marital status", she wrote "single", listed her mother under "heroes" and under "children", wrote: "someday".

She wrote: "I love things like good wine, rock climbing, backpacking long distances with people I love, yoga on a rainy day, making coffee, drinking tea, and lots of languages".

"I’m 20 years old and I like new things. Ooh, and soccer, and roller coasters, and Harry Potter, and..."

Last night, her parents insisted there had been a "horrible mistake" and that she was innocent.

Her stepmother Cassandra Knox, 45, said from her home in Seattle: "I just don't believe a word of it. I just can't imagine there is any truth in it at all."

She added of Knox's father William, 47: "He is in a state of utter shock and disbelief. There's no way she could have done it, it’s all a horrible mistake."

Knox's mother, Edda, 45, was said to be flying out to Italy today.

(Left: Amanda Knox and Raffaele Sollecito, from ABC News.)





What frightens many bloggers, is how Amanda's blog is now being used as evidence.

Moral of the story: Fantasies we write about may one day bite us in the ass, so be careful. For example, if I should write that a certain person makes me sick and I wish they would die, and they end up dead under questionable circumstances, does that automatically make me a suspect? (And if so, is that fair?)

If your roommate ends up raped and murdered and you have written fantasies on your blog about rape and murder, well, talk about some bad luck, huh?

Monica Guzman, at the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, asks some of these questions:
If there is a unwritten Law of Internet Privacy, it is this: Anything you post can and will be used against you in the court of public opinion.

Take Amanda M. Knox, the University of Washington student whose alleged involvement in the killing of British exchange student Meredith Kercher has set the media and the public on an online manhunt for every shred of Knox's online presence, with those aspects that paint her as the circumstances do -- as a drunk, misbehaving bad girl -- rising to the top.

Forget "you have the right to remain silent." Amanda is a child of the social Web. She may not have ever had a choice.

And for someone heavily involved in a murder investigation, "public opinion" isn't the half of it. Dan Gonsiorowski of Seattlest commented this morning:
From the papers in Europe, and particularly in England, you'd think that UW student Amanda Knox had already been tried and convicted of sexually assaulting and killing her roommate Meredith Kercher in Perguia, Italy. ... The English media has already dug up plenty of evidence from the detritus a student leaves on the Internet in the course of a modern life.
Gonsiorowski doesn't use the word "evidence" literally. But he points out that all these things -- the MySpace profile, the Facebook self-descriptions, the YouTube video
[Now removed--DD] that under different circumstances would be laughed off as typical college debauchery -- are, in fact, playing the role of evidence online. The boost of legitimacy comes from several media outlets for which the Internet is just as open and easy a source of information as it is for everybody else.

It may be easy. But is it fair? Are we, the media, and we, the public, presenting personal information posted on the You Tube and MySpace world -- with which we have only a couple of years' experience -- as responsibly as we should?

It should be noted that Knox's statement to police, as reported in the Times UK (she describes being in the room next to where Kercher was killed, hearing her screams but doing little about them), and the fact that this was the second story she told police remain the most damning pieces of evidence against her.

Still, statements she made to the world before she knew we'd be listening are having an impact. This morning I asked the Big Blog's official Facebook group how (and if) we can ensure that personal information posted online -- which has become such a goldmine of quick, juicy information -- is viewed so that fairness rises above assumption. Most agreed that there is no shame in distributing information that is already public when events call for it. But they also expressed concern that online "evidence" can be taken too far, and that the conclusions inferred from it can do more harm than good.

On Knox's MySpace profile today, friends have left messages of consolation and offers to help. "I believe in you," said one commenter. "Stay strong," another said.

What do you think?

P.S. -- About that YouTube video, which was made remarkably, almost ridiculously prominent in this Daily Mail article ...

The most common way we avoid our responsibility as online viewers is to pin it all on the online creators. There are good reasons for this, but they get weak as online profiles become more entrenched in our social lives.

It is true that no one's forcing anyone to share themselves online. It is also true that many people who do share parts of their lives choose to leave out the drunk parts. That doesn't mean they don't happen.

Clearly, something in Knox's personality made her feel comfortable enough posting that video. But that scene was something I saw in college every week. Does Knox's choice to post the video excuse us from placing it in its appropriate context?
Context? Like, getting drunk and going apeshit?

That kind of context hurts, rather than helps, which is sorta the point.

And so, the tabloid-story-of-the-season (the year?) rages on. The truth, as usual, is wrapped up somewhere in the media-mess. For everyone's sake, let's hope we get it.


*Comparatively speaking, that is! I usually don't get much traffic, which is why that kinda blew my mind.

----------------
Listening to: Grateful Dead - I Know You Rider
via FoxyTunes

19 comments:

abstractjenn said...

Wow - this story is incredible. I don't really know what to think.

assembling words to armory, she waits... said...

wow! this story is unbelievable! you know, i had a conversation fairly recently offline with a fellow blogger about how easy it is to reveal very personal things about yourself online. there's a sense of false comfort that veils you. somehow we consider the keyboard and monitor a shield of sorts... it just goes to show that we need to be more aware of the power in blogging.

Anonymous said...

I'm not sure what point you're trying to make. Are you annoyed that an American woman has been accused of murder or are you angry that Amanda Knox's rather seedy internet postings are being picked over by the international media? When you put something into the public domain whether it's on YouTube or Facebook or the print media, you have no control over how people interpret it, so frankly if you're worried about interpretation, don't post it. Trying to control the way people think smacks of a police state.

DaisyDeadhead said...

Here is an excellent review of the actual story Amanda wrote online, that has caused her to become a suspect.

Anonymous: I'm not sure what point you're trying to make.

I find the story unnerving. I write about unnerving things.

Are you annoyed that an American woman has been accused of murder

If she's guilty, no, I'm not annoyed. If she is being railroaded because she wrote a dirty story, then yes, I think a certain amount of outrage is in order. Don't you?

In America, if you are "accused"--then you are CHARGED WITH A CRIME. If they don't have the evidence to charge you, they can't "accuse" you or hold you indefinitely. Apparently, they can do this in Italy, yes?

or are you angry that Amanda Knox's rather seedy internet postings are being picked over by the international media?

It takes a lot to make me "angry." ...I find it an interesting and newsworthy situation, as a blogger and as someone who has written very personal things on email lists, websites, other people's blogs, etc.

When you put something into the public domain whether it's on YouTube or Facebook or the print media, you have no control over how people interpret it, so frankly if you're worried about interpretation, don't post it.

20/20 hindsight. How do we know what to worry about, exactly, until something like this happens? That's my point. Something you thought was mere fantasy is suddenly used as evidence against you. How could you possibly know it would be used, beforehand? You can't know that.

Trying to control the way people think smacks of a police state.

Excuse me? I think they should turn her loose if they have no hard evidence. That is hardly the position of a person in favor of a police state. (How could I "control the way people think", exactly?)

Anonymous said...

Daisy, if you did your research properly, you'd find that Amanda Knox has been made a suspect because her DNA has been found on the knife that killed Meredith Kercher, because her fingerprints have been found on Meredith Kercher's face (do you know how much force you need to apply to leave your fingerprints on someone's body??) and because she's changed her account of that night three times.

I don't need to read reviews of Amanda Knox's stories - I've read her ACTUAL stories and formed my own opions of them. Besides the rape story that the media are fixated about, she wrote another story about a young woman who'd suffered from sexual violence. As writers, we write about things that interest us & that we have knowledge of - personally I find it distaste that a young woman is fixated on violence against women. On a purely technical level, I think that Amanda Knox really doesn't have much talent as a writer though.

You mention how the American legal system works - well Italy has a different legal system and again, if you'd done your research properly you'd know that the three suspects are being held because the investigating judge felt that there was a very real danger of them fleeing. Personally, I don't have a problem with that. I do however have a HUGE problem with America and American ways being held up as an example of how the rest of the world should behave.

DaisyDeadhead said...

Daisy, if you did your research properly, you'd find that Amanda Knox has been made a suspect because her DNA has been found on the knife that killed Meredith Kercher, because her fingerprints have been found on Meredith Kercher's face (do you know how much force you need to apply to leave your fingerprints on someone's body??) and because she's changed her account of that night three times.

I've researched this plenty. The DNA evidence only came out last night, and I did not have a chance to get to it until now.

Yes, if you read BOTH my posts, you know that I have already reported that her story had repeatedly changed. Apparently you didn't do your research on my posts, before commenting on them.

I don't need to read reviews of Amanda Knox's stories - I've read her ACTUAL stories and formed my own opions of them. Besides the rape story that the media are fixated about, she wrote another story about a young woman who'd suffered from sexual violence. As writers, we write about things that interest us & that we have knowledge of - personally I find it distaste that a young woman is fixated on violence against women.

Your taste and mine are not enough to convict people, though. I am focused on actual evidence.

I believe "innocent until proven guilty" is the proper way to proceed, and yes, I believe the rest of the world could greatly benefit from that. Our problems in the USA always occur whenever we stray from that high standard.

On a purely technical level, I think that Amanda Knox really doesn't have much talent as a writer though.

You mention how the American legal system works - well Italy has a different legal system and again, if you'd done your research properly you'd know that the three suspects are being held because the investigating judge felt that there was a very real danger of them fleeing. Personally, I don't have a problem with that. I do however have a HUGE problem with America and American ways being held up as an example of how the rest of the world should behave.


Don't let the doorknob hit you in the ass. Ciao.

Anonymous said...

Daisy, I did read your first (copy & paste) story on the murder of Meredith Kercher & I'm fully aware of the fact that you mentioned that Amanda Knox had changed her story. You didn't however mention that her fingerprints had been found on Meredith Kercher's face. In your second post you took the opinion that Amanda Knox had been arrested merely for writing a strange story on My Space - 'What frightens many bloggers, is how Amanda's blog is now being used as evidence'.

'Don't let the doorknob hit you in the ass. Ciao.' Wow! You're unable to back up your statements so you're resorting to childish taunts. Certainly increased my respect for you.

DaisyDeadhead said...

Ah, a misunderstanding. You think I am "making statements" that need "backing up"... nah, nothing as intense or heavy as that. I am musing about how this case reads to the average person (of whatever country), who is likely getting only the sensationalist and spotty accounts, as most people get their news these days. I was analyzing this case as a tabloid sensation, and how internet identities are basic to this case as a "murder story". The "murder story" narrative we know from countless television shows and movies, and an all-purpose narrative we almost-instinctively rely on.

Musings and impressions hardly need to be "backed up with facts"--I have mostly repeated what journalists have written, after all. They supposedly have the facts. If they don't, hold them accountable, not me.

I am commenting on how they have chosen to present those facts.

Wow! You're unable to back up your statements so you're resorting to childish taunts.

I resorted to the awful childish taunts after your nasty anti-American remark on an AMERICAN blog, and I dunno where YOU were born and where YOU are from, but that is just plain rude. I do not go to the blogs of various people of various countries and start trashing them at random, or accusing them of liking their ways better. Well, OF COURSE THEY DO.

OF COURSE I am going to talk about legal procedure in the language of an American, it is the only such language I know. And I daresay, I
know the flaws of my country far, far better than you do, and the judicial concept of "innocent until proven guilty" is patently NOT one of those flaws, but one of those shining, beautiful concepts we are damned proud of in these parts.

So, when you tell me my accounts of American experience constitute "American ways being held up as an example of how the rest of the world should behave"--well, what can I say to that? I almost wrote "fuck off" and then thought the better of it. This is a southern blog, and we are polite as we reload. So, I wrote CIAO.

If you'd prefer some other sentence, pretend I wrote that.

Lisa Harney said...

This isn't really a reason that I keep as much personal information out of the blogosphere as possible, but it does only encourage it.

I do find it unsettling that Amanda's writing is seen as evidence of her guilt, regardless of other evidence that may redeem or damn her. Focusing on her stories is just pure sensationalism, and leaves people feeling less safe about posting their stuff.

I'd hate to see a backlash akin to the post-Columbine zero tolerance policies in high schools.

DaisyDeadhead said...

UPDATE as of November 16th, from Times Online UK

Traces of DNA belonging to Amanda Knox and Meredith Kercher were found on a knife at the flat of Raffaele Sollecito, Ms Knox’s boyfriend and co-accused in Ms Kercher’s murder.

Investigators said that the kitchen knife had traces of the two women’s DNA on its 8-inch (20cm) blade. Ms Kercher’s was on the tip, and Ms Knox’s close to the handle. No trace of Mr Sollecito, 23, was found. Italian media said that the DNA samples had come from blood that had been washed from the blade.

Police said it was not clear whether the kitchen knife was originally from Mr Sollecito’s flat, where it was found, or if had been taken from the cottage where Ms Kercher was killed.

Detectives had said that a flick knife that Mr Sollecito carried around with him was “compatible” with the weapon used to slash the British student’s throat, but that that knife had yielded no DNA. The reports said that Ms Knox could have cut herself while washing it, or while holding it in her fist. Investigators have tended to discount the theory that she dealt the fatal blow, because of the force involved.

The discovery of the DNA traces was confirmed by Giacinto Profazio, head of the flying squad in Perugia, who described them as a significant development.

Mr Sollecito has told police that he barely knew Ms Kercher, 21, who was found seminaked with her throat cut two weeks ago. The DNA traces were discovered by police scientists who examined Mr Sollecito’s collection of knives as well as his Nike trainers, which are said to match a bloody footprint at the cottage. Traces of both Mr Sollecito’s and Ms Knox’s DNA were also found on a sponge and a cloth found at the murder scene.

Defence lawyers for Mr Sollecito expressed indignation on behalf of his family at the latest leak from the investigation. They said the forensic tests had shown no significant traces on Mr Sollecito’s trainers. He has denied being in the cottage which Ms Kercher and Ms Knox shared on the night of the murder. Ms Knox has also denied being there, but on one occasion gave police a different version in which she admitted she was present but accused Diya “Patrick” Lumumba, a Congolese bar owner for whom she occasionally worked, of carrying out the killing.

Mr Sollecito, 23, Ms Knox, 20, from Seattle and Mr Lumumba, 37, are all being held on suspicion of involvement in the killing on the evening of November 1.

Police technicians yesterday began examining the hard disk of Mr Sollecito’s computer, on which he claims he surfed the internet at home on the evening of the murder. The results of tests on hair mingled with blood found clutched in the fingers of Ms Kercher’s left hand are still awaited.

Police said that phone records showed that the phone rang at Mr Sollecito’s flat around midnight on the evening of the murder, with no answer. Records also show that Mr Sollecito’s father, a urologist in Bari in southern Italy, sent him a text message to say goodnight, with no reply.

Mr Sollecito has said he has a hazy recollection of the evening as he had smoked cannabis. He insists that he was at his flat the whole time and Ms Knox returned there at 1am.

Phone records also show that a call was made from Ms Kercher’s mobile at 10.15pm on the evening of her murder. It is not known whether the call, to a message service advising how much phone credit is left, was made by Ms Kercher, or by her killers, to give the impression that she was alive. The phone was found near to the cottage-traced by police to Ms Kercher’s flat. There they found Ms Knox and Mr Sollecito, who claimed that there had been a break-in. Ms Kercher’s body was found in her bedroom.

A local newspaper claimed that Ms Knox’s and Mr Sollecito’s fingerprints were found in the cottage. There were no prints from Mr Lumumba, who has witnesses to back up his alibi that he was in his bar, Le Chic, all evening. The fact that faeces in the shared bathroom at the cottage were not those of any of the three suspects has reinforced the investigators’ belief that a fourth person was involved.

Reports said that a witness who had contradicted Mr Lumumba’s claim that he had opened his bar “about 5.30 or 6pm” on the evening of the murder had changed his mind and now says he “cannot be 100 per cent sure”.

Italian prosecutors believe Ms Kercher was murdered after refusing to take part in an extreme sex game.

All three of the suspects have denied any wrongdoing.

Rosa said...

When I'm intrested in a sensational news story I often end up here, and here is his info on this case-
http://www.truecrimeweblog.com/2007/11/american-murderess-in-italy.html

He does a great job of finding people's pages, blogs, and other online pages, if it's him that finds it. But it's an interesting read.

Yes, it is frightening that a web page/blog could be used against you. But what difference is there between a handwritten journal and a blog when evidience is being sought? I would think none.

Lisa Harney said...

So writing fiction should count as evidence toward guilt, whether you write it on a blog or on paper?

That's like - if I were a murder suspect - pointing to the fact that I own video games like Doom and Half-Life as evidence that I want to gun people down in real life.

Rosa said...

No, I wasn't talking about fiction, I was thinking along the lines of journal/diary material.

Anonymous said...

By the way, this is wrong: 'because her fingerprints have been found on Meredith Kercher's face '..

There were bruises on Meredith's neck that were consistent with a smaller hand than the other suspects, which is why they think Amanda held her down..

Not exactly 'fingerprints' then..

Lisa Harney said...

Amanda's writings were fiction, weren't they? Short stories about rape and murder?

DaisyDeadhead said...

Update from UK Telegraph:

Freed Meredith suspect will never forgive Knox

By Malcolm Moore in Perugia
Last Updated: 2:37am GMT 22/11/2007

The Congolese bar owner who spent two weeks in prison after being accused of the murder of British student Meredith Kercher has said he will never forgive her flatmate Amanda Knox for involving him in the case.

Patrick Diya Lumumba, 37, was arrested after Knox, 20, told police she had a "vague recollection" that he had killed Miss Kercher after having sex with her. On Tuesday, Mr Lumumba was set free after the prosecution admitted there is no "serious evidence" that he was involved.

Miss Kercher, 21, from Coulsdon, south London, was found on Friday November 2 with her throat cut in her house in Perugia.

Investigators have now claimed that Knox named Lumumba as the killer in order to cover for a fourth suspect.

Knox, 20, "tried to cover" for Rudy Hermann Guede, 20, who was captured on Tuesday on the run in Germany, it was alleged.

As a result, Mr Lumumba was arrested and spent two weeks in prison, only being released on Tuesday. "I will never forgive her," he said on Wednesday. In the meantime, Guede was able to flee Perugia and enter Germany.

In the official document that requests Mr Lumumba's release from prison, Giuseppe Mignini, the chief prosecutor in the case, said Knox "was trying to move all the attention onto Lumumba". He admitted that apart from Knox's testimony, there was "no serious evidence" to link Lumumba to the crime.

Mr Lumumba told La Repubblica, an Italian newspaper on Wednesday: "I ask myself: why did Amanda draw me into this? I was trying to help that girl out with some work." He also asked: "Is it because I am black?"

Knox, who is still being held on suspicion of murder and sexual assault, used to work at Mr Lumumba's bar, Le Chic.

He said: "My lawyer explained to me that in her first interrogation, Amanda did not mention me. So something came into my mind. The day before the arrest, November 5, I met her before the University for Foreigners. Perhaps at that moment she remembered me and decided to draw me into it."

Mr Lumumba also revealed the moment at which he was handcuffed in front of his two-year-old son. He said: "I woke up early that morning, at dawn to warm the milk for my son. My son can already walk, and when he heard the bell ring he went to the door to answer it. I followed him, opened the door, and found myself face-to-face with the agents. That is when my nightmare started."

However, he said police had not asked him whether or not he was involved. "The worst thing is that they never tried to find out a motive. Couldn't they have asked me, before handcuffing me, where I had been that evening or that night? Couldn't they have carried out a little bit more investigation?" he said.

His wife, Alessandra, said: "When I was finally able to visit him in prison, it was enough to look into his eyes to know the truth. As soon as I saw him we hugged and had a giggle. It was all so absurd."

One of Knox's friends, Spyros Gatsios, told police that she had sent him a text message the day after Miss Kercher's body was found saying: "I'm so tired".

Mr Gatsios said Knox, who called herself FoxyKnoxy on her MySpace website, had just started going out with Raffaele Sollecito, 23, who is also a suspect, at the time of the killing.

"She said she had met a guy, and she liked him because he was very shy. She added that she did not feel great about it because she was having a simultaneous relationship with an American boy who she kept in touch with through chats on the webcam at the internet café where I work. But she was smiling about it," he said.

Sollecito is also in custody. An eight-inch kitchen knife, found at Sollecito's house, allegedly had traces of Knox's DNA on the handle and Miss Kercher's DNA at the tip. It had been bleached clean.

Meanwhile, Guede, who is from the Ivory Coast, told a court in Germany that he "did not commit any offence". However, the judge confirmed his arrest on suspicion of murder and sexual assault. His father, Pacome Guede, said his son "always wanted the best for other people." He added: "I am sure he is innocent".

Guede allegedly told a friend the night before he was arrested: "I was not there that night. If they found my fingerprints, it means I had left them there before. I had been in the house before, but not on the day of the killing. I knew Amanda and I knew Meredith, but I did not kill her."

It emerged on Wednesday that Guede had been sleeping rough while in Germany, in a barge on the river Rhine, and in empty train carriages. He had asked for political asylum in Germany.

Five days before the murder of Miss Kercher, Guede was discovered to have broken into a nursery school in Milan, where he had spent the night. He was armed with an 11-inch kitchen knife. He told police he had to "protect" himself against thieves.

DaisyDeadhead said...

All further inquiries on this case, for the time being, need to go here:

Seattle Crime Blog: Amanda Knox

Harry Rag said...

The English translation of Judge Massei's sentencing report can be downloaded from here:

http://www.perugiamurderfile.org/viewtopic.php?p=53735

Meridia said...

Wow!!! this story is incredible. I don't really know what to think.